Spot 1: OTHER SPECIES

OTHER SPECIES

Passenger—Migration Patterns on the Living and Those of the Dead

Millions of dead birds follow such new migratory paths, which draw capital from the south and the east into the north and the west. Often, these paths consolidate, convene in the centers of the colonizing empires—London and Paris—for a few years, or decades, before moving on to museums in the new world. These routes are not the birds’ natural flyways. They are new paths toward a capitalist archive that usurps purpose from the world it exploits.

Type:
Features
Source:
Winter 2022/23
Credit:
Text / Xenia Benivolski

Cornell Labs Panama Fruit Feeder Cam at Canopy Lodge

The Fruit Feeder can be viewed as a kind of durational performance art. Its participants may be unaware of their roles, but they perform their daily dramas nevertheless. Fights between peckish birds over the best bit of mango or the prime perch on a branch often rattle the otherwise tranquil setting. The overwhelming growth and decay of the surrounding forest and the exhausting, relentless tussle between life and death infuse the scene with a kind of madness

Type:
Reviews
Credit:
Text / EC Flamming

Liv Bugge: The Consequence of Touching Oil

“What is the consequence of touching oil—of coming to know it in an embodied sense? What gets destabilized when oil slips out of the category of the inhuman, even momentarily? To make an image with the body requires revaluation of the discursive function of touch. I propose that Bugge’s document of people touching oil and becoming aware of its aliveness, its animateness, awakens those people to the violent relationship humans have not only with oil, but also with the world beings that humans broadly consider inanimate.”

Type:
Features
Source:
Winter 2022/23
Credit:
Text / Natasha Marie Llorens

Spot 2: INTERSPECIES THOUGHTS

INTERSPECIES THOUGHTS

An Eye for An Eye — Bambitchell’s Bugs and Beasts Before the Law

Bugs and Beasts works to remind viewers that such stories aren’t simply dusty curiosities from the footnotes of history books, but practices that fundamentally shaped how we came to understand the intersections between performance, punishment, and the social and legal limits of personhood. 

Type:
Features
Source:
Fall 2021
Location:
Seattle, WA
Credit:
Text / Daniella Sanader

Symbionts: Contemporary Artists and the Biosphere

Each collaborative entity mobilizes its own kind of micro-performance, but together they maintain a coherence through the way we simultaneously apprehend them in the sensorium. As such, the materials feel less instrumentalized by aesthetics and more mysterious.

Type:
Reviews
Source:
February 1, 2023
Location:
Cambridge, MA
Credit:
Text / Laurel V. McLaughlin

I Will Not Be Purified

Anyone who has ever been life-threateningly ill will know the desperation it breeds. You’ll try anything. You’ll do anything. And when treatments fail, and doctors—shockingly unskilled in empathy—shrug and suggest this means you will die, you start looking anywhere for help.

Type:
Features
Source:
Fall 2021
Credit:
Text / Sophie Strand

Unbecoming Human — Interview with TJ Shin

Los Angeles–based artist TJ Shin’s work centers on living processes. It explores the felt experience of postcoloniality through intimate sensorial...
Type:
Interviews
Source:
Fall 2022
Credit:
Interview / Re’al Christian

Spot 3: TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE

TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE

Logistics Make the World

Synchronizing the world of commerce means attempting to overcome time and space. A study of logistics with a photo essay on UPS by Dustin Chambers.

Type:
Features
Source:
January/February 2015
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Text / Jesse LeCavalier
Photo Essay / Dustin Chambers

WE RIDE THE MARTA BUS

If highways and thoroughfares are Atlanta’s arteries, its bus stops are its pulse sites— places at which human life most authentically inhabits a city on the move.

Type:
Projects
Source:
July 25, 2018
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Art / Ruth Dusseault

Port Authorities

Mere mention of the word “airport” may trigger certain emotional responses. Some may not be positive. Airports are the unpleasant part of the journey, the necessary evil. But what if airports become the destination?

Type:
Features, Interviews
Source:
Summer 2018
Credit:
Text / Agatha Kessler; Images / Yuri Pattison

Black Folks on Bikes

Interviews with members of community and advocacy groups changing the iconography of the American cyclist, with portraits of MOBB-ATL Cycling Club by Zach Wolfe.

Type:
Features, ProjectsInterviews
Source:
January/February 2016
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Text + Interview / zahra alabanza; Images: Zach Wolfe

Spot 4: EMBODIED KNOWLEDGE

EMBODIED KNOWLEDGE

Embodied Knowledge

Letter from the Editor

Type:
Letters
Source:
Fall 2022
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Sarah Higgins

Charmaine Minniefield:
Indigo Prayers: A Creation Story

Inside the John Howett Works on Paper Gallery at Emory University’s Michael C. Carlos Museum, Indigo Prayers: A Creation Story...
Type:
Reviews
Source:
Fall 2022
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Text / Tyra A. Seals 

A Movement of the Earth Against the World

Kassel has a fabled history. The Brothers Grimm emerged here during a paradigm shift that marked the amalgamation of Germany’s...
Type:
Reviews
Source:
Fall 2022
Location:
Kassel, Germany
Credit:
Text / Xenia Benivolski

Gone But Not Disrespected

On the last Sunday in June 2022, a particularly hot day in Philadelphia, about 100 of us gathered in front of Saint Luke’s landing for the culmination of an experimental AIDS memorial called Gone and for Ever, a community-informed spectacle of sight, sound, and grief—part of Remembrance, a project of the William Way LGBT Community Center and funded by the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage—to grapple with the question of how to memorialize amid the ongoing crisis.

Type:
Features
Source:
Fall 2022
Credit:
Text / Theodore Kerr

Spot 5: REVIEWS

REVIEWS

Reckless Rolodex

The January 17, 1997 episode of This American Life—hosted by Ira Glass, on the Chicago-based NPR-affiliate radio station WBEZ—featured “stories...
Type:
Reviews
Source:
March 22, 2023
Location:
Chicago, IL
Credit:
Text / Michael Dango

Fuego Nuevo —Sergio Suárez

Through a combination of printmaking, ceramics, and installation, Sergio Suárez uses distinct traditional techniques to assemble a visual language, one that examines the fusion, impermanence, and consistency of objects, images, and structures. The exhibition is framed by the Meso-American, post-classical-period ceremony Fuego Nuevo (New Fire)—a ritual enacted every 52 years to ensure that the sun would return, thus staving off the end of the world.

Type:
Reviews
Source:
December 30, 2022
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Text/ Jacob O'Kelley

Leah Clements—INSOMNIA

Providing access to the exhibition for blind and partially sighted people, this audio description acts as a way in for all audiences. Excitingly, here, through this interpretive sonic contribution, the visual aid becomes an affective feature rather than simply a functional element. It affects pace, the order of encounter, and the awareness of oneself in the environment, embedding us within it. It asks us to pay attention, to be indulgent with our time, and in so doing, to allow details and sensations to emerge.

Type:
Reviews
Source:
January 18, 2023
Location:
London, UK
Credit:
Text/ Kit Edwards

Spot 6: FROM THE ARCHIVES

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Augmented Reality Revolution

Céline Browning introduces a wave of artists using smart phone apps to reclaim public spaces of protest.

Type:
Features
Source:
November/December 2014
Location:
Public Space
Credit:
Text / Céline Browning

Achieving Blankness

Notes from the edge of the Atlanta Airport
with photography by Johnathon Kelso

Type:
Features
Source:
January/February 2016
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Text / Hannah Palmer; Images / Johnathon Kelso

Dead Ends

Atlanta’s Great Southwest Industrial Park was once home to masterpieces of American midcentury minimalism; now the site is overgrown and semi-disused, and we can’t find the Donald Judd. Photo essay: David Naugle

Type:
Features
Source:
July/August 2015
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Text / Chris Fite-Wassilak
Photo Essay / David Naugle

Spot 7: IN CONVERSATION

IN CONVERSATION

Pearl Cleage: Fragile Bodies on a Fragile Planet

The thing that strikes me more and more as I get older is how we spend so much time and energy and bluster building cities, having wars, dominating and insulting each other, when all the time, we are living inside these fragile bodies that have to exist on a fragile planet in the company of other fragile beings and unknown viruses.

Type:
Interviews
Source:
April 27th, 2022
Location:
Atlanta, GA
Credit:
Interview / Edward Austin Hall

Curtis Patterson: A Monument Maker Gets His Due

Melissa Messina, the show’s curator, speaks with Patterson about teaching, monuments to civil rights leaders, and his current studio practice, on the occasion of the artist’s first commercial gallery exhibition.

Type:
Interviews
Source:
April 27, 2022
Location:
Savannah, GA
Credit:
Interview / Melissa Messina

Greg Ito: Looking Back to Let Go

This is probably the most personal show I’ve made. I want people to know that the work is connected to these real experiences, so there’s pretty intimate stuff that’s only been seen within our family circle .… I had to ask my mom if it was okay to share these photographs. Since we weren’t able to get permission from relatives who have passed to share these things, all the faces are going to be covered with small white stickers. That way we can keep our family identities private and off the internet. These stickers also create a pathway for viewers to insert themselves into [my family’s] experience.

Type:
Interviews
Source:
May 11, 2022
Location:
San Diego, CA
Credit:
Interview / Stephanie Bailey