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Para-institutional Kinshasa—Interview with Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondo

Lauren Tate Baeza and Vitshois Mwilambwe Bondo talk about particularities of how a continent-wide trend of community-centered and para-institutional arts organizing unfolds in his hometown of Kinshasa; his personal journey from artist to administrator; and his own organization, Kin ArtStudio.

Type:
Interviews
Source:
Spring 2022
Location:
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Credit:
Interview / Lauren Tate Baeza

We Meet in a Patchwork: Landscapes and Elsewheres

In the following collaborative text, Makshya Tolbert and DJ Hellerman weave a patchwork of shared curiosity and mutual enchantment while physically re/situating themselves within the American Southeast. At the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts exhibition The Dirty South: Contemporary Art, Material Culture, and the Sonic Impulse, Tolbert and Hellerman’s bodies and spirits converge, diverge, expand.

Type:
Features
Source:
Winter 2021
Location:
Richmond, Virgina
Credit:
Text / DJ Hellerman and Makshya Tolbert

War Inna Babylon: The Community’s Struggle for Justice Truths and Rights

War Inna Babylon is not an exhibition; it is an everyday lived reality. Although we’ve exhibited some of the experience, I want people to feel it, feel like they have to do something, and [then] ask what we do next. To understand that you can’t sit on the fence, because if you do, you are supporting the status quo.

Type:
Interviews
Source:
Spring 2022
Location:
London, England
Credit:
Interview / Stephanie Bailey

Indicting the Poisonous Imaginary—Radha D’Souza and Jonas Staal

In 2021 D’Souza and Staal came together to stage the Court for Intergenerational Climate Crimes (CICC) at Framer Framed in Amsterdam. Described as “a more-than-human tribunal to prosecute intergenerational climate crimes” committed by Unilever, ING, Airbus, and the Dutch state, the court drew from D’Souza’s book What’s Wrong With Rights? Social Movements, Law and Liberal Imaginations.

Type:
Features, Interviews
Source:
Spring 2022
Credit:
Interview / Stephanie Bailey

Greg Ito: Looking Back to Let Go

This is probably the most personal show I’ve made. I want people to know that the work is connected to these real experiences, so there’s pretty intimate stuff that’s only been seen within our family circle .… I had to ask my mom if it was okay to share these photographs. Since we weren’t able to get permission from relatives who have passed to share these things, all the faces are going to be covered with small white stickers. That way we can keep our family identities private and off the internet. These stickers also create a pathway for viewers to insert themselves into [my family’s] experience.

Type:
Interviews
Source:
May 11th, 2022
Location:
San Diego, CA
Credit:
Interview / Stephanie Bailey